Finish the Race Well

When Sue and I attended the Old Dominion Association of Church Schools, I had the  privilege and opportunity to speak with Dan Zacharias, Executive Director of ODACS, a few times. On one such occasion he shared with me by stating, “My coach would always tell me not to just run to the finish line, but run all the way through the finish line.” In other words, don’t be satisfied with just completing a task, project, or directive; but go that extra mile by surpassing what is expected or required. So today I pass on those great words of wisdom. As educators for Christ, we must prepare, plan, and execute those daily tasks with excellence. In order to finish well, we can check our motives by continuing to practice doing what we do everyday, as unto God. We must then pass that same baton of excellence on to our students as we encourage them to run all the way through the finish line.

“On your mark, get set, and go pass that anointed baton of excellence, and do it all to the Glory of God!”  When God is glorified, you can rest assured that you have finished it well.

Deidre Hester, Voice I

Finishing a job, assignment, or task can have an entirely different meaning than finishing those things well.  It all depends on each individual’s interpretation of when the job is completed. I would encourage parents, who are their child’s first teachers, to be mindful of the fact that what they accept at home in terms of the work effort from their child, will be modeled outside the home – usually at school and later on the job. The Biblical principle of “finishing well” should be applied everywhere, not only when cleaning a room, washing dishes, or raking leaves, but also in completing assignments, following coaches instructions, and making time for guitar practice. Children learn to give what is expected, so why should we expect less than their best. Parents and teachers are preparing our next generation for their futures. Teach them to work hard and finish well, because ultimately, they will be the ones to benefit.

Sue Whited – Voice II

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